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Que vous soyez expert ou débutant, "vieux" fan ou jeune fan, venez vous présenter !
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Moonbeam
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12 juin 2020, 07:32

Bonjour a tous !

Je m'appelle Ian et j'habite en Australie. Je suis fan de Prince depuis 1989, quand j'avais 9 ans.

Mes 10 meilleurs albums seraient:

1. 1999
2. Lovesexy
3. Controversy
4. The Gold Experience
5. Sign o' the Times
6. :symbol:
7. Parade
8. Purple Rain
9. Dirty Mind
10. 3121

Mes 10 meilleurs chansons seraient:

1. "Moonbeam Levels"
2. "Something in the Water (Does Not Compute)"
3. "1999"
4. "Crystal Ball"
5. "Peach"
6. "Anna Stesia"
7. "The Cross"
8. "Controversy"
9. "Mountains"
10. "All the Critics Love U in New York"

Je ne parle pas très bien le français mais je peux lire mieux que je ne sais le faire. J'utilise Google Translate pour ce message, au cas où ce ne serait pas évident. Je suis allé 5 fois en France (Montpellier) et j'adore ! La culture, les gens, LE FROMAGE ! :D

J'adore voir qu'il y a une si grande communauté ici. Qui sait, j'apprendrai peut-être un peu plus le français ici ? En attendant, est-ce que tu peux poster des choses en anglais ?
Heureusement coincé en 1982
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Greghost
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12 juin 2020, 07:49

:merci: Bienvenu à toi !

Welcome !
Gregory looks just like a ghost...
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Nevermind2b
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12 juin 2020, 11:42

Salut Ian !

Bienvenu chez les "Purple Froggies" ;-)

On "Crôa*" en toi pour animer ce forum des antipodes / We "Crôa*" in you to animate this forum from the antipodes. :malin1: :rouge: :kiss2:

* onomatopée francophone simulant le "cri" de la grenouille / French onomatopoeia simulating the "cry" of the frog - "Crôa" = croit = believe

Bon ok je sors… :mrgreen:
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lord farell
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12 juin 2020, 20:09

Et le vin rouge ?
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musicum
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15 juin 2020, 03:21

Bienvenue sur le forum Schkopi,
Moonbeam a écrit :Je m'appelle Ian et j'habite en Australie. Je suis fan de Prince depuis 1989, quand j'avais 9 ans.
Tu peux nous en dire plus sur l'intérêt que tu portes à Prince depuis ton jeune âge ?
" Et ils dient : "Chevaliers somes,
Qui an noz afeires alomes. "

(Chrétien de Troyes - Le Chevalier de la Charrette )
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:22

Greghost a écrit :
12 juin 2020, 07:49
:merci: Bienvenu à toi !

Welcome !
Merci beaucoup!
Heureusement coincé en 1982
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:24

Nevermind2b a écrit :
12 juin 2020, 11:42
Salut Ian !

Bienvenu chez les "Purple Froggies" ;-)

On "Crôa*" en toi pour animer ce forum des antipodes / We "Crôa*" in you to animate this forum from the antipodes. :malin1: :rouge: :kiss2:

* onomatopée francophone simulant le "cri" de la grenouille / French onomatopoeia simulating the "cry" of the frog - "Crôa" = croit = believe

Bon ok je sors… :mrgreen:
Crôa*, Crôa* ! :blub:
Heureusement coincé en 1982
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:25

lord farell a écrit :
12 juin 2020, 20:09
Et le vin rouge ?
Je ne bois pas d'alcool habituellement (moins d'une fois par an). Vous serez heureux de savoir que la seule fois où je bois, c'est quand j'ai du vin rouge en France!
Heureusement coincé en 1982
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:28

musicum a écrit :
15 juin 2020, 03:21
Bienvenue sur le forum Schkopi,
Moonbeam a écrit :Je m'appelle Ian et j'habite en Australie. Je suis fan de Prince depuis 1989, quand j'avais 9 ans.
Tu peux nous en dire plus sur l'intérêt que tu portes à Prince depuis ton jeune âge ?
Bien sûr! J'ai beaucoup écrit à ce sujet en anglais, donc si ça va, je pourrais partager certaines choses que j'ai écrites sur ce que Prince a voulu dire sur le plan personnel. Tout d'abord, concernant la sortie prochaine de 1999 Deluxe:

It’s been 29 years since I first immersed myself into Prince’s magnum opus 1999. For 29 years, it has felt like more than an album to me – 1999 creates its own solar system populated by 11 different worlds I could visit over and over again, in which light exists in the form of neon purple rays and senses melt together into a fluorescent magma of vision, sound, and movement. From childhood through adolescence, adulthood, and parenthood, its magnetism hasn’t dulled a bit.

I think part of it is that it feels like his most isolated album, like the songs were borne out of experiments devised and undertaken with limitless abandon inside a secluded lab. Many of the songs have an outward focus, such as the party call-to-arms of “D.M.S.R.” and the global apocalypse of “1999”, but the spirit of the album feels singular. It’s in the primordial screams of “Something in the Water (Does Not Compute)”. It’s in the feeling that the world may be watching (and even applauding), but those people don’t – they CAN’T – know the real you that echoes through “All the Critics Love U in New York”. It’s in the retreat from the perils of the real world where he can finally let his innermost thoughts out in “Lady Cab Driver”. Even the encounters with others – the flirtatious come-ons to the object of his affections in “Let’s Pretend We’re Married”, the mechanical declarations of love and lust in “Automatic”, the desperate confessions in “Lady Cab Driver”, the grandiose jetsetting of “International Lover” – these interactions feel like fantasy, concoctions of a vivid imagination. It’s that sense of aloneness that makes 1999 the perfect album to serve as a soundtrack to your escape into your inner sanctum, where your thoughts can run wild and free.

I’ve gone on and on about the album itself and it’s momentous personal impact. In short, it gave me the confidence to be unswervingly me, to forge a strong sense of self that I wouldn’t sacrifice. It led me into a wide community of Prince fans, many of whom have become very dear friends. It led me to my wife, and in doing so, led me to my new country and career. I both lost and found myself in the worlds of 1999 time and time again.

Inevitably, my Prince fandom led me to collect a number of bootlegs, many of which contained hidden worlds within 1999’s ever expanding solar system. Songs like “Possessed”, “Extraloveable”, and “Do Yourself a Favor” added impossibly good dimensions to the sound of 1999. “Purple Music” encapsulated the entire ethos of the era, a quaking colossus of a song outlining the all-encompassing panacea that this vibrant sci-fi synth funk provided. “No Call U” and “Turn It Up” (then split into a part 1 and a part 2) ignited with a hyperactive drive propelled by neon synths. And in “Moonbeam Levels”, I found heaven in song, an otherworldly embodiment of the transformative power of Prince’s music, and an inspiration for my screen name at all sites I frequent. For the past 20 years, I have filled disc after disc with companion sets to 1999 with these hidden treasures, gleefully expanding them with each new song that was unearthed.

Tomorrow, the solar system 1999 is due to expand to a galaxy. This super deluxe version is literally a dream come true after all these years. The past two months have filled me with the strangest feeling, as I have been put in a position to anticipate something that feels like it has been permanently engrained in my DNA. Unheard titles like “Rearrange” and “Bold Generation” and “You’re All I Want” have ignited that same sense of wonder in me that the infinite soundscapes of the album have filled me with for nearly 30 years. And the album itself! The prospect of experiencing that opening seismic rumble of the drum machine in “1999” in remastered quality mere hours from now leaves me overawed. I guess that’s what purple music’s all about!
Modifié en dernier par Moonbeam le 15 juin 2020, 04:33, modifié 1 fois.
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:30

L'année dernière, j'ai mis à jour ma liste d'albums préférés de tous les temps (mon top 650!), Et j'ai écrit une histoire personnelle sur chacun de mes 25 meilleurs, donc je vais partager les princesses.

All time favorite albums #20: Prince - Sign o' the Times (1987)

There’s been no more empowering nor rewarding musical experience for me than getting into Prince. His music has become such a huge part of my life that it has shaped who I am and ultimately, who I married, where I live, and my career. Diving headfirst into each album was such a treat. No album showcases the multifaceted sprawling genius of Prince quite like Sign o’ the Times, a double album that spans smoldering R&B, pop, Christian rock, synth funk, soul, and psychedelia while lyrically running the gamut from social commentary to new dance styles to heady introspection. Each song was a new journey.

There was plenty for me to enjoy right away - the jubilant yellow of “Play in the Sunshine”, the vibrant nursery rhyme of “Starfish and Coffee”, the sizzling dancefloor bombshell of “U Got the Look”, the frolicking pulse of “Strange Relationship”, the pop/rock splendor-meets-jazz/funk “I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man”, the thought-provoking funk rock of “Sign o’ the Times”, and mostly, the raucous spiritual fire of “The Cross” all immediately imprinted themselves on me and never let go. These songs created their own worlds, planting seeds as my musical taste and identity were still germinating.

There were also songs that took time to reveal their full power to me. I wasn’t quite ready for the blurry moods of “The Ballad of Dorothy Parker” or the freakiness of “If I Was Your Girlfriend” when I first heard the album, but their brilliance eventually became undeniable with time. And while I had always loved “Forever in My Life”, the song gained new resonance as I sang it to my newborn son, rocking him back and forth.

There are a few Prince albums that rank higher for me, but Sign o’ the Times deserves its status as a sort of consensus fan favorite among the Prince fan community.

Top 3 Favorites:

“The Cross”
“Sign o’ the Times”
“Starfish and Coffee”
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:36

#14: Prince - The Gold Experience (1995)

Though my Prince fandom started in 1989 and kicked off in a big way in 1990 and 1991, it was as much about his older songs and albums that I was discovering as it was about the new albums. Symbol from 1992 was an exception, a titanic rock/pop/funk opera that was all-encompassing (it nearly made my top 25). But the most fevered pitch I felt about a new Prince album came with The Gold Experience. I’ve seen a silly Facebook thing go around saying something like “the song that was #1 on your 14th birthday defines your life”. And while most of the music during my teenage years was definitely NOT defining for me, I was 14 when I first heard songs from The Gold Experience, and they certainly felt like life blood at the time. Prince performed a lot of songs throughout 1994 that had not been released yet, and it built up an excitement for a new album that has never been topped. Hearing “Interactive” and “Endorphinmachine” at a VH1 awards show, “Dolphin” on Letterman and especially, “Now” on Soul Train was electrifying. What were these songs?! Why can’t I buy them?! They were so hungry and wild, and were scheduled for an upcoming album, The Gold Experience (though "Interactive" was later cut), which was continually delayed until its final release in late September of 1995. Waiting over a year to hear these songs felt like torture.

When the album finally came out, it confirmed the impression I had. The first album credited to his symbol moniker, it’s clear Prince was extending a giant middle finger to Warner Bros, and the dispute had lit within him a fire that rivaled the hunger he displayed from 1980-1982 before he became a megastar. The blood-curdling screams of “Now”, “Endorphinmachine”, and “P Control”, the wailing guitars of “Dolphin”, “Shhh”, and “Gold”, the scorching grooves of “319” and “Billy Jack Bitch”, and the fury of “Eye Hate U” were all set to white-hot temperatures that blazed within me over and over again. The album contained his last mega-hit in “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World”, but nice enough as that song is, it feels like barely an afterthought on this set bursting with fire. I may not have had a bounty of watershed albums that defined pop culture to serve as a soundtrack to my teenage years, but I had this album.

Top 3 Favorites:

“Now”
“319”
“Endorphinmachine”
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:38

#9: Prince - Controversy (1981)

I’ve always had a lot of energy - perhaps too much. I put my poor parents through far too many trips to the emergency room, from cutting my foot open from stepping on a sprinkler to breaking my shoulder when our playground set fell on top of me to nearly losing my toe when it got caught in a bike chain as I was riding barefoot. Running felt more natural than walking a lot of time, even into my 20s. And in my clubbing days, I couldn’t stop myself from burning so much energy, at times being asked “what are you on?!” by amused lookers-on. When my future wife first came to visit in 2003, my dad warned her jokingly about my energy level.

How does this relate to Controversy? I’ve long held it in far higher esteem than most Prince fans. It’s probably the album from his “golden period” that fans tend to be least enthusiastic about, even though it still has its backers. One reason I hold it in such high regard is because it bursts with more youthful energy than any of his other albums. There’s a wild abandon to songs like “Ronnie Talk to Russia”, “Sexuality”, and “Private Joy”, and this hyperactive energy resonates within me when I listen to them. Even songs that aren’t quite as plugged into a light socket showcase the same sort of zeal. “Controversy” rides a hefty thumping synth bass rhythm occasionally punctuated by grunts for over 7 minutes as it sets out his vision of utopia through racial, spiritual, and sexual harmony. “Let’s Work” features the most libidinous bassline of his career as his carnal come-ons stretch his falsetto into unfettered screams, while “Annie Christian” and its nightmarish electric fields pulse with unpredictable vitality. Even the ballad “Do Me, Baby” sees Prince unable to contain himself, breaking into some of the most primal and blood-curdling shrieks of his career. Rick James branded his sound as “punk funk”, but that term seems most suited to Controversy out of any album I’ve heard. There’s a sort of trilogy of albums from 1980 to 1982 that saw Prince at his hungriest, bursting with a desperation to release his messages and visions of the world to the masses. The album may have its flaws compared to an acclaimed opus like Sign o’ the Times, but the youthful vitality of Controversy is so damn infectious that I can’t help but love it.

Seeing that same tireless energy in my son and seeing it resonate in him when he squeals at the Princely yelps on the album and asks me to jump up and down to the hyperactive rhythm of “Ronnie Talk to Russia” and march atop couch cushions arranged in a circle throughout the duration of “Controversy” (he clearly picked up on the hypnotic rhythm of the song) makes the album all the more special. The album has taken permanent residence in our CD player downstairs as he asks to dance with me to it so much. I’m 39 now, but listening to the album brings out the inner 23-year-old in me like no other.

Top 3 songs:

“Controversy”
“Private Joy”
“Let’s Work”
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:41

#4: Prince - Lovesexy (1988)

After first hearing Prince in 1989 with the Batman soundtrack, it was a wonderful adventure going through his back catalogue and discovering the wonderful surprises that awaited me. Each album felt markedly different to the next, with different soundscapes and looks marking each with a unique feeling. I grew up in a very spiritual household, to the point that some of my elementary school teachers thought I would become a pastor someday. As Lovesexy stands as the most spiritual album from his glory days, it connected with me spiritually in a way that is second to none. While there are many Prince albums that are defined by their spiritual tone, Lovesexy is by far the most joyous and the most inclusive of these, bursting with a universal love communicated in brilliant technicolor relief.

I must have played Lovesexy almost every day during my senior year of high school, when I was near my most spiritually plugged in and I had a seemingly limitless appetite for these vivid splashes of jubilation. The ecstasy that beams out of songs like "Eye No", "Glam Slam" (especially that glorious synth string coda), the title track, the lush "When 2 R in Love", and especially the hallowed "I Wish U Heaven" felt so thrillingly vibrant, as if the EXTEND stage from Bubble Bobble had been filtered through the gates of Heaven. These songs also intertwined spiritual fulfillment and romantic devotion in a way that made me hopeful to have this sort of soul mate someday. The feelings of these songs tapped into my innately joyful spirit like no album before or since managed to do.

It was the songs that were about overcoming darkness that had the biggest impact. While most of the album brought to life the whites, pinks, lavendars, and sky blues of the album cover, "Positivity" is bathed in midnight blue with its murky, beguiling bass line, piercing guitars, and beats straight out of Mega Man 2. Its call for positivity became something of a personal mantra, one that I returned to again and again during particularly challenging times. Even more powerful was "Anna Stesia", in which Prince seems to be uncharacteristically revealing of his vulnerability, recounting the overwhelming loneliness he felt and the vices he turned to as a result, ultimately stumbling on closeness to God as a respite from this loneliness. It converts the heightened urgency of the album into outright desperation. Having battled feelings of loneliness for a long time, it was completely electrifying to me through my late teen years and early 20s. "Anna Stesia" inspired me enough that I performed a piano version twice during university events. As seemingly everything around me changed during those years, these songs were my lifeblood.

The live concert video from Dortmund which chronicled the subsequent Lovesexy tour was equally gripping. Witnessing the playful genius of the piano medley, the blistering guitar baptism as he converted "I Wish U Heaven" into gospel splendor, and the thematic inflection point of "Anna Stesia" was completely mesmerizing. If I ever had to present a skeptical person with evidence of Prince's greatness, it's this live concert I would choose. Though my faith may not be as unswerving as it once was, whenever I need to be reminded of that overwhelming joy and blazing fire, Lovesexy is the one.

Top 3 songs:

"Anna Stesia"
"Positivity"
"I Wish U Heaven"
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Moonbeam
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15 juin 2020, 04:48

#1: Prince - 1999 (1982)

Ordering this top 25 has been very difficult. I've actually changed the order of the remaining albums a few times, making this exercise feel a bit like Album Survivor. That said, there was never any doubt that 1999 would be my #1. The way it has imprinted itself on my soul blows everything else away.

When I first heard Prince in 1989, I encountered some of his earlier singles through music videos during days-long MTV video marathons where they would play several videos from tons of artists. In this way I discovered the magic of songs like "When Doves Cry", "Let's Go Crazy", "Raspberry Beret", "Kiss", "U Got the Look", and "Alphabet St.". But it was "1999" that hooked me. The opening fanfare of the synths immediately grabbed my attention, soon joined by that first Earth-shattering rumble of the Linn 1 drum machine, and then exploded into a funk bonanza with the delectable bass and guitar licks. The way it wedded the neon of synths with the irresistible gravitational pull of funk left me completely mesmerised, connecting to the deepest part of me. It sounded so massive, an unconquerable force of nature that unleashed unfathomable joy and perpetual motion all at once, tapping into some unlocked quintessence of me later joined by The Gap Band's "You Dropped a Bomb on Me" and Stevie Wonder's "My Eyes Don't Cry".

I started to buy music that year after my parents bought me a cassette player. I quickly bought a BackTrax cassette single featuring "1999" and "Little Red Corvette", another herculean song which used its synths so differently, ebbing and flowing with cinematic warmth before kicking into pop/rock immortality. I played it over and over until I eventually bought a cassette of the whole album, and thus began my decades-long obsession with this album. Actually, the word "album" doesn't cut it, as 1999 feels like an entire world unto itself. Indeed, the songs felt like they were conceived or hatched or unearthed in an isolated lab, cracking open new dimensions that melded sounds and images and all sorts of emotions into a sort of primal omnipresence.

Every single song ingrained itself into my every fiber. I discovered with delight that "1999" offered even more thrills than the sub 4-minute single version I knew and loved, opening with a robotic god-like voice announcing its desire for the listener to have fun before the rumbles of the Linn 1 deliver just that, activating the galactic motion of the thing for over 6 minutes of extended revelry. "Little Red Corvette" was improved with its extended pyrotechnics as well, while "Delirious" was an immediate hit for me with its squeaking synths amplifying a delightful zaniness. "Let's Pretend We're Married" paired Hi-NRG relentlessness with wanton desire in pulsating bursts of megavoltage. "D.M.S.R." was a call to arms for revellers of all sorts, with sassy, brassy synths prancing atop lethal slap bass licks guaranteed to shake and quake a crowd. The synths in "Automatic" were so singularly captivating, transmitting an alien glow equal parts eerie and irresistible. Both "Something in the Water (Does Not Compute)", with its fractured nightmarish magma of scalding synths, frenzied Linn drum patterns, and primordial shrieks as well as "Free" with its anthemic fireworks ignited my emotions. "Lady Cab Driver" blended blistering rock volcanism with thumping funk rhythms, and "All the Critics Love U in New York" convulsed with such a galvanizing freakiness that my face contorted inexorably to the rhythm of its hyperfunkplasma. And the swansong ballad "International Lover" ended the voyage with decadent verve.

1999 engaged me on all levels - it sparked my imagination, burned deep within my soul, and willed me to dance as if by remote control. The purple neon futuresynth soundscape that ties the album together saw my awestruck wonder extend to seemingly limitless heights. Most of the songs stretched to 6, 7, 8, or 9 minutes, but I felt they could go on forever, drowning each corner of my being in succulent splashes of serotonin. More than that, 1999 emboldened me to remain true to myself. In Prince, I had found a hero - this 5'3" titan of a man raised his freak flag so unapologetically high for all to see. At 10 years old, I had begun to feel like I didn't quite fit in, but 1999 helped to instill within me an insistence that I would not, could not change who I was at my core. If Prince could overcome the family troubles that saw him leave home at 12 as well as God-knows-what harassment due to his race, height, and comfort with his feminine side to release something so unrelentingly badass, I could face my troubles headfirst as well. In this way I felt not only permission, but a DUTY to be myself when I played the album. I had a very strong sense of who I was, and with 1999 I had a reliable way to reconnect with my sense of self when times got hard. If I needed confidence, I could blast "1999" or "D.M.S.R." to pep myself up. When I felt heartbreak or loneliness, I could lose myself in the guttural wails of "Something in the Water (Does Not Compute)" to exorcise those demons. If I felt like I was too weird for the world, I could play "Automatic" or "All the Critics Love U in New York" and feel encouraged to not only accept, but celebrate the quirks that made me… me.

I became a bit of a "purple evangelist", unable to help myself from proselytising about the wonders of Prince and his music. I've bought dozens of copies of 1999 over the years, both for myself and as gifts to others, even strangers who overheard it playing at a drive-thru window. It became a part of my identity, and my resultant Prince fandom changed my life in major ways, introducing me to dozens of friends, and eventually, the love of my life. I wouldn't have met my wife without Prince. I wouldn't have moved to Australia and started my career as a university academic without Prince. I wouldn't have my son without Prince. In Prince, I found not only an identity to help guide me throughout my childhood and adolescence, but a unique map to my wife, my new home country, and an entirely new life for me. And it was the opening rumble of "1999" that opened the door.

As such, as an album 1999 is the Alpha and the Omega for me. It was on 1999 that the peak of Prince's hunger met the peak of his vision and the peak of his ambition, creating the most vibrant soundscape of any album ever made. It is a 70 minute symphony of neon purple lasers illuminating a pitch black sky that will thrill and amaze me until the day I die. The wails of "Something in the Water" still go right through my core, that drum machine rumble in "1999" still moves with seismic thunder, the alien synthscape of "Automatic" still leaves me breathless, the twisted funk of "All the Critics in New York" still ignites wild fits of dancing in me, the propulsion of "Let's Pretend We're Married" still inhabits me with each pulse, the punishing bass and sassy synth of "D.M.S.R." still get me moving thousands of listens later.

It creates the most vivid pictures in my mind. I mean look at those worlds on the cover art that he drew! Prince made those worlds come to life in such a visual, visceral way. The ladder in the E leading up to the red staircase that climbs into the clouds in particular is so striking. And the guy isn't climbing the stairs as much as he is GROOVING his way up them. If I could think of one image of what Prince's music can do, it would be this. If "everybody's looking for the ladder" as Prince would later sing, I found mine in 1999.

Top 3 songs:

"Something in the Water (Does Not Compute)"
"1999"
"All the Critics Love U in New York"
Heureusement coincé en 1982
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17 juin 2020, 22:43

Merci pour les extraits de cette belle "biographie discographique" dans laquelle de nombreux "Purple Friends" se reconnaîtront. :merci:
" Et ils dient : "Chevaliers somes,
Qui an noz afeires alomes. "

(Chrétien de Troyes - Le Chevalier de la Charrette )
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